‘Nomad’ Planets Could Outnumber Stars 100,000 to 1
Could the number of wandering planets in our galaxy planets not  orbiting a sun be more than the amount of stars in the Milky Way?  Free-floating planets have been predicted to exist for quite some time  and just last year, in May 2011, several orphan worlds were finally  detected. But now, the latest research concludes there could be 100,000  times more free-floating planets in the Milky Way than stars. Even  though the author of the study, Louis Strigari from the Kavli Institute  for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC), called the amount an  astronomical number, he said the math is sound.
Even  though this is a large number, it is actually consistent with how much  mass is in our galaxy and heavy elements we have our galaxy, Strigari  told Universe Today.  So even though it sounds like a big number, it  puts into perspective that there could be a lot more planets and other junk out in our galaxy than we know of at this stage.
And by the way, these latest findings certainly do not lend any credence to the theory of a wandering planet named Nibiru.
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‘Nomad’ Planets Could Outnumber Stars 100,000 to 1

Could the number of wandering planets in our galaxy planets not orbiting a sun be more than the amount of stars in the Milky Way? Free-floating planets have been predicted to exist for quite some time and just last year, in May 2011, several orphan worlds were finally detected. But now, the latest research concludes there could be 100,000 times more free-floating planets in the Milky Way than stars. Even though the author of the study, Louis Strigari from the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC), called the amount an astronomical number, he said the math is sound.

Even though this is a large number, it is actually consistent with how much mass is in our galaxy and heavy elements we have our galaxy, Strigari told Universe Today. So even though it sounds like a big number, it puts into perspective that there could be a lot more planets and other junk out in our galaxy than we know of at this stage.

And by the way, these latest findings certainly do not lend any credence to the theory of a wandering planet named Nibiru.

[click to continue…]