Black Holes: Incredibly Loud and Extremely Distant
This post is the third in a series that accompanies the upcoming publication of my book ‘Gravity’s Engines: How Bubble-Blowing Black Holes Rule Galaxies, Stars, and Life in the Cosmos’ (Scientific American/FSG).
In space it’s a good thing that you can’t hear black holes scream.
Although some of the most incontrovertible evidence for the existence of supermassive black holes comes from observing their gravitational effect on neighboring stars, there are other even more spectacular clues. The clearest of these were unwittingly seen in extraterrestrial radio signals as far back as the late 1930′s, and then observed with increasing fidelity as better and better technology allowed astronomers to map out the cosmos.
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Black Holes: Incredibly Loud and Extremely Distant

This post is the third in a series that accompanies the upcoming publication of my book ‘Gravity’s Engines: How Bubble-Blowing Black Holes Rule Galaxies, Stars, and Life in the Cosmos’ (Scientific American/FSG).

In space it’s a good thing that you can’t hear black holes scream.

Although some of the most incontrovertible evidence for the existence of supermassive black holes comes from observing their gravitational effect on neighboring stars, there are other even more spectacular clues. The clearest of these were unwittingly seen in extraterrestrial radio signals as far back as the late 1930′s, and then observed with increasing fidelity as better and better technology allowed astronomers to map out the cosmos.

Continue Reading