Early Earth Should Have Been A Snowball, But Wasn’t 
A new theory suggests that unusual greenhouse gases might have kept the planet warm back before the sun was bright enough to do the job.
When our sun first got going, some 4.5 billion years ago, it wasn’t the same blazing star we know today—its warmth and brightness grew gradually as more and more of its fuel ignited. So, for Earth’s first two billion years, our planet was bathed in a light 25 percent dimmer than it receives today.
Continue Reading
high resolution →

Early Earth Should Have Been A Snowball, But Wasn’t

A new theory suggests that unusual greenhouse gases might have kept the planet warm back before the sun was bright enough to do the job.

When our sun first got going, some 4.5 billion years ago, it wasn’t the same blazing star we know today—its warmth and brightness grew gradually as more and more of its fuel ignited. So, for Earth’s first two billion years, our planet was bathed in a light 25 percent dimmer than it receives today.

Continue Reading