Was Einstein right?
Nearly a century after the world’s greatest physicist, Albert Einstein, first predicted the existence of gravitational waves, a global network of gravitational wave observatories has moved a step closer to detecting the faint radiation that could lead to important new discoveries in our universe.
David Blair is a Winthrop Professor of Physics at The University of Western Australia and Director of the Australian International Gravitational Research Centre at Gingin - 87km north of Perth.  He leads the WA component of a huge international team that has announced a demonstration of a new measurement technique called ‘quantum squeezing’ that allows gravitational wave detectors to increase their sensitivity.
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Was Einstein right?

Nearly a century after the world’s greatest physicist, Albert Einstein, first predicted the existence of gravitational waves, a global network of gravitational wave observatories has moved a step closer to detecting the faint radiation that could lead to important new discoveries in our universe.

David Blair is a Winthrop Professor of Physics at The University of Western Australia and Director of the Australian International Gravitational Research Centre at Gingin - 87km north of Perth.  He leads the WA component of a huge international team that has announced a demonstration of a new measurement technique called ‘quantum squeezing’ that allows gravitational wave detectors to increase their sensitivity.

Continue Reading