Supermassive Black Holes at Galaxy Centers—“Exit Doors from Our Universe”
Once an object fall through the event horizon of a black hole, they’re lost forever. “It’s an exit door from our universe,” said Shep Doeleman, assistant director at the MIT Haystack Observatory and research associate at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. “You walk through that door, you’re not coming back.” Supermassive black holes are the most extreme objects predicted by Albert Einstein’s theory of gravity — where, according to Doeleman, “gravity completely goes haywire and crushes an enormous mass into an incredibly close space.”
In September of 2012, an international team, led by researchers at MIT’s Haystack Observatory, measured the radius of a black hole at the center of a distant galaxy — the closest distance at which matter can approach before being irretrievably pulled into a black hole, which can be billions of times more massive than our sun may reside at the heart of most galaxies. Such supermassive black holes are so powerful that activity at their boundaries can ripple throughout their host galaxies.
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Supermassive Black Holes at Galaxy Centers—“Exit Doors from Our Universe”

Once an object fall through the event horizon of a black hole, they’re lost forever. “It’s an exit door from our universe,” said Shep Doeleman, assistant director at the MIT Haystack Observatory and research associate at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. “You walk through that door, you’re not coming back.” Supermassive black holes are the most extreme objects predicted by Albert Einstein’s theory of gravity — where, according to Doeleman, “gravity completely goes haywire and crushes an enormous mass into an incredibly close space.”

In September of 2012, an international team, led by researchers at MIT’s Haystack Observatory, measured the radius of a black hole at the center of a distant galaxy — the closest distance at which matter can approach before being irretrievably pulled into a black hole, which can be billions of times more massive than our sun may reside at the heart of most galaxies. Such supermassive black holes are so powerful that activity at their boundaries can ripple throughout their host galaxies.

Continue Reading