Researchers Reveal More about How Our Brains Control Our Arms
Recording the neural activity of monkeys as they plan to reach, or just react, will help engineers design better brain controlled prosthetic limbs.
Ready, set, go.
Sometimes that’s how our brains work. When we anticipate a physical act, such as reaching for the keys we noticed on the table, the neurons that control the task adopt a state of readiness, like sprinters bent into a crouch.
Other times, however, our neurons must simply react, such as if someone were to toss us the keys without gesturing first, to prepare us to catch.
Continue Reading

Researchers Reveal More about How Our Brains Control Our Arms

Recording the neural activity of monkeys as they plan to reach, or just react, will help engineers design better brain controlled prosthetic limbs.

Ready, set, go.

Sometimes that’s how our brains work. When we anticipate a physical act, such as reaching for the keys we noticed on the table, the neurons that control the task adopt a state of readiness, like sprinters bent into a crouch.

Other times, however, our neurons must simply react, such as if someone were to toss us the keys without gesturing first, to prepare us to catch.

Continue Reading